Brain-Rain.

Science in action. And also, goofing off.

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Posts tagged insects

Aug 28
heythereuniverse:

Butterfly scales | Jo Angell Design
Coloured Scanning Electron Micrograph (SEM) of scales from the wing of a peacock butterfly, Inachis io. These scales have an intricate design and overlap like the tiles on the roof of a building. They allow heat and light to enter, and also insulate the insect. They may also be highly coloured. The metallic appearance of the scales is due to ridges along their length. 

heythereuniverse:

Butterfly scales | Jo Angell Design

Coloured Scanning Electron Micrograph (SEM) of scales from the wing of a peacock butterfly, Inachis io. These scales have an intricate design and overlap like the tiles on the roof of a building. They allow heat and light to enter, and also insulate the insect. They may also be highly coloured. The metallic appearance of the scales is due to ridges along their length. 


Aug 26

finding-things-out:

Meet another kind of dinosaur

When you think of dinosaurs, you might think of those found in the movie Jurassic Park, but there were many other prehistoric animals that are still around today. And some lived even before dinosaurs first appeared: dragonflies and damselflies!

Damselflies (suborder Zygoptera) are insects in the order Odonata. Damselflies are similar to dragonflies, but the adults can be distinguished by the fact that the wings of most damselflies are held along, and parallel to, the body when at rest. Furthermore, the hindwing of the damselfly is essentially similar to the forewing, while the hindwing of the dragonfly broadens near the base. Damselflies are also usually smaller than dragonflies and weaker fliers in comparison, and their eyes are separated.

Although, the Damselfly is talented enough to tuck their wings onto their back, they are not skilled enough to be able to walk.  That’s right, this particular insect has no problem landing but they are incapable of walking due to the position of their legs.

Watch the video


Aug 14
kinpunshou:

so this morning i was playing with the slow-mo mode on my phone, hoping to get a majestic vid of a bumblebee taking off
but instead i found this 

kinpunshou:

so this morning i was playing with the slow-mo mode on my phone, hoping to get a majestic vid of a bumblebee taking off

but instead i found this 


Aug 4
buggirl:

Love this- very educational….and look at all their funny faces!!
Here is the key:
1. Family Lycosidae – the Wolf Spiders2. Family Salticidae – the Jumping Spiders3. Family Salticidae, genus Lyssomanes – the Magnolia Green Jumpers4. Family Araneidae – the Orbweavers5. Family Pisauridae, genus Dolomedes – the Fishing Spiders6. Family Pisauridae, genus Pisaurina – the Nursery Web Spiders7. Family Ctenidae – the Wandering Spiders8. Family Oxyopidae – the Lynx Spiders9. Family Philodromidae – the Running Crab Spiders10. Family Dysderidae – the Woodlouse Hunters11. Family Tetragnathidae, genus Tetragnatha – the Longjawed Orbweavers12. Family Thomisidae, genus Xysticus – the Ground Crab Spiders13. Family Agelenidae, genus Eratigena – the Funnel Weavers14, Family Agelenidae, genus Agelenopsis – the Grass Spiders (aka Funnel Weavers)15, Family Selenopidae, genus Selenops – the Flatties (aka Crab Spiders)16. Family Sparassidae, genus Heteropoda – the Huntsman (aka Giant Crab Spiders)17. Family Sparassidae, genus Olios – Giant Crab Spiders (aka Huntsman)18. Family Sicariidae, genus Loxosceles – the Brown Spiders (includes the Brown Recluse)19. Family Uloboridae, genus Hyptiotes – the Triangle Weavers20. Family Zoropsidae, species Zoropsis spinimana – the False Wolf Spider21. Family Deinopidae, species Deinopis spinosa – the Net-casting Spider (aka Ogre-faced Spider); note that the four other eyes are not visible from the front.22. Family Diguetidae, genus Diguetia – the Desertshrub Spiders23. Family Antrodiaetidae, genus Antrodiaetus – the Folding-door Spiders (aka Turret Spiders); these are primitive spiders (mygalomorphs).24. Family Segestriidae – the Tube Web Spiders25. Family Scytodidae – the Spitting Spiders
Buggirl’s spider research

buggirl:

Love this- very educational….and look at all their funny faces!!

Here is the key:


1. Family Lycosidae – the Wolf Spiders
2. Family Salticidae – the Jumping Spiders
3. Family Salticidae, genus Lyssomanes – the Magnolia Green Jumpers
4. Family Araneidae – the Orbweavers
5. Family Pisauridae, genus Dolomedes – the Fishing Spiders
6. Family Pisauridae, genus Pisaurina – the Nursery Web Spiders
7. Family Ctenidae – the Wandering Spiders
8. Family Oxyopidae – the Lynx Spiders
9. Family Philodromidae – the Running Crab Spiders
10. Family Dysderidae – the Woodlouse Hunters
11. Family Tetragnathidae, genus Tetragnatha – the Longjawed Orbweavers
12. Family Thomisidae, genus Xysticus – the Ground Crab Spiders
13. Family Agelenidae, genus Eratigena – the Funnel Weavers
14, Family Agelenidae, genus Agelenopsis – the Grass Spiders (aka Funnel Weavers)
15, Family Selenopidae, genus Selenops – the Flatties (aka Crab Spiders)
16. Family Sparassidae, genus Heteropoda – the Huntsman (aka Giant Crab Spiders)
17. Family Sparassidae, genus Olios – Giant Crab Spiders (aka Huntsman)
18. Family Sicariidae, genus Loxosceles – the Brown Spiders (includes the Brown Recluse)
19. Family Uloboridae, genus Hyptiotes – the Triangle Weavers
20. Family Zoropsidae, species Zoropsis spinimana – the False Wolf Spider
21. Family Deinopidae, species Deinopis spinosa – the Net-casting Spider (aka Ogre-faced Spider); note that the four other eyes are not visible from the front.
22. Family Diguetidae, genus Diguetia – the Desertshrub Spiders
23. Family Antrodiaetidae, genus Antrodiaetus – the Folding-door Spiders (aka Turret Spiders); these are primitive spiders (mygalomorphs).
24. Family Segestriidae – the Tube Web Spiders
25. Family Scytodidae – the Spitting Spiders

Buggirl’s spider research


Jul 18
Orchid Mantis

(via zyxst)


Jul 13
peaceful-moon:

thank you so much little buddy

peaceful-moon:

thank you so much little buddy

(via aromaladyrose)


Jun 29

biomorphosis:

This is not a tasty gummy sweet but a Jewel Caterpillar (family Dalceridae) found in Amazon Rainforest. They are covered with sticky goo-like, gellatinous tubercles that provides protection from its predator like ants until they metamorphosise into winged moths.

(via iaccidentallyallthephysics)


Jun 19

zitoisneato:

batter-sempai:

transientday:

lohkir:

fencehopping:

Casting a fire ant colony with molten aluminum

Not saying that killing ants just because it’s cool. But hey.

I’ve seen this post and the original video before.

That ant colony belongs to an invasive species of fire ant (called Red Imported Fire Ants or RIFAs) which cause more harm to the local environment than good. Researchers are experimenting with extremely high temperatures as a means to dispose of invasive insect species and, just so you know, molten aluminum is VERY HOT.

Not saying this is the best way to do it, but these folks are doing a service for the local environment and they got a beautiful piece of art for their efforts.

It’s also good for Science because we get to see what the inside of a fire ant nest look like. That’s really cool.

Thats pretty metal.


Mar 27

falabaloo:

Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey (camouflage)  

(via ichthyologist)


Mar 20
lieutenantbites:

thank you science

lieutenantbites:

thank you science

(via iguanamouth)


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