Brain-Rain.

Science in action. And also, goofing off.

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Posts tagged insects

Mar 27

falabaloo:

Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey (camouflage)  

(via ichthyologist)


Mar 20
lieutenantbites:

thank you science

lieutenantbites:

thank you science

(via iguanamouth)


Feb 20

Feb 19

scientificvisuals:

Rain in a small world. Scenes from Microcosmos.


Jan 29

gothamknowledge:

biomorphosis:

Maratus volans, better known as the Peacock Spider. The brilliant colouring is not just for decoration but also to attract females. The peacock spider has earned its name when he courts with his mate through dancing. Like a peacock, he raises his two magnificently coloured flaps and dances for the female.

Good Monday Morning. Enjoy this dancing Peacock Spider.

(via lychgate)


Jan 5

ftcreature:

The Featured Creature:

Stunning Bright Blue Cloud Forest Millipede Is Sure to Shock You

Okay, who’s ready to have their mind BLOWN?!

Check out this absolutely stunning Blue Cloud Forest Millipede (Pararhachistes potosinus) found only in the remote high altitude cloud forests of Mexico. The bright blue coloration warns predators about its ability to produce toxic secretions.

View the full article for more pics and deets!

Photo credits: Luis Stevens, George Grall

(via supernikoe)


Dec 4
biocanvas:

Proboscis of a moth
Butterflies and moths have a very tight evolutionary relationship with the flowers on which they feed. They feed with a long, coiled, straw-like mouthpart called a proboscis. Because flowers come in all different shapes and sizes, butterflies and moths need to evolve mouthparts that can reach the nectar inside different flowers. In fact, Charles Drawin once examined a flower with a nectary hidden nearly 12 inches inside the plant and predicted a moth must exist with an equally long proboscis to feed on that flower. The existence of such a moth was discovered 40 years later.
Image by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz, HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus.

biocanvas:

Proboscis of a moth

Butterflies and moths have a very tight evolutionary relationship with the flowers on which they feed. They feed with a long, coiled, straw-like mouthpart called a proboscis. Because flowers come in all different shapes and sizes, butterflies and moths need to evolve mouthparts that can reach the nectar inside different flowers. In fact, Charles Drawin once examined a flower with a nectary hidden nearly 12 inches inside the plant and predicted a moth must exist with an equally long proboscis to feed on that flower. The existence of such a moth was discovered 40 years later.

Image by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz, HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus.

(via bleb-punk)


Dec 2
amnhnyc:

Zebra longwing caterpillars evolved the ability to thrive despite feeding on toxic passionflower plants. 
See two live caterpillar species in The Power of Poison. While you’re at it, here’s what to do and see this Thanksgiving weekend at the Museum.

amnhnyc:

Zebra longwing caterpillars evolved the ability to thrive despite feeding on toxic passionflower plants. 

See two live caterpillar species in The Power of Poison. While you’re at it, here’s what to do and see this Thanksgiving weekend at the Museum.


Nov 27

consultingmoosecaptain:

cannibal-swag:

rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. 

Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. 

Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.

 

how does one train a bee

BEEEEES

(via poplockandhobbit)


Sep 26

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