Brain-Rain.

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Posts tagged astronomy

Jul 26

Jul 22
mapsontheweb:

The size of North America compared to the Great Red Spot on Jupiter.
Great Red Spot, an enormous, long-lived storm system on the planet Jupiter and the most conspicuous feature of its visible cloud surface. It is generally reddish in colour and oval in shape, approximately 20,000 km long and 12,000 km wide (12,400 by 7,500 miles)—large enough to engulf Earth and Mars side by side.

mapsontheweb:

The size of North America compared to the Great Red Spot on Jupiter.

Great Red Spot, an enormous, long-lived storm system on the planet Jupiter and the most conspicuous feature of its visible cloud surface. It is generally reddish in colour and oval in shape, approximately 20,000 km long and 12,000 km wide (12,400 by 7,500 miles)—large enough to engulf Earth and Mars side by side.

(via probablyapyro)


Jul 18
amnhnyc:

This diagram shows our cosmic address at a glance. We see our planetary system around the Sun, our stellar neighborhood in our galaxy, our galaxy in the local group of galaxies, and our group in the entire universe. 
Learn more in the Cullman Hall of the Universe. 

amnhnyc:

This diagram shows our cosmic address at a glance. We see our planetary system around the Sun, our stellar neighborhood in our galaxy, our galaxy in the local group of galaxies, and our group in the entire universe. 

Learn more in the Cullman Hall of the Universe


Jul 17
estufar:

An actual headline from The New York Times in 1919 

estufar:

An actual headline from The New York Times in 1919 

(via shoukichikun)


Jul 16
ucresearch:

An invisible force at the center of our galaxy
Scientists have theorized that our Milky Way galaxy has a super massive black hole at the center of it, but how did this idea come about?  How do astronomers measure something that has actually never been seen in our telescopes?
Above is an animation of star movements in our galaxy over the past 16 years.  They all orbit around a point that emits no light in our galaxy.  We can measure the mass of these stars and calculate that their orbits require an object with the mass of 4 million Suns.  So far this points to a super massive black hole in our galaxy.
Read more about how galaxies obtain these supermassive objects →

ucresearch:

An invisible force at the center of our galaxy


Scientists have theorized that our Milky Way galaxy has a super massive black hole at the center of it, but how did this idea come about?  How do astronomers measure something that has actually never been seen in our telescopes?

Above is an animation of star movements in our galaxy over the past 16 years.  They all orbit around a point that emits no light in our galaxy.  We can measure the mass of these stars and calculate that their orbits require an object with the mass of 4 million Suns.  So far this points to a super massive black hole in our galaxy.

Read more about how galaxies obtain these supermassive objects →

(via scientificsatellite)


ageofdestruction:

everywhere: Moon and Earth, photographed by Apollo 17, 15th December 1972.
10 frames, covering about 4 minutes of real time.
Image credit: NASA/JSC/ASU. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

ageofdestruction:

everywhere: Moon and Earth, photographed by Apollo 17, 15th December 1972.

10 frames, covering about 4 minutes of real time.

Image credit: NASA/JSC/ASU. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

(via thedemon-hauntedworld)


Jul 15

heythereuniverse:

Clouds Detected on Alien Planet —New Hubble Discovery | TheDailyGalaxy

Weather forecasters on exoplanet GJ 1214b would have an easy job. Today’s forecast: cloudy. Tomorrow: overcast. Extended outlook: more clouds. A team of scientists led by researchers in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago report they have definitively characterized the atmosphere of a super-Earth class planet orbiting another star for the first time.

[Read more]
Source photo 1: [Tyrogthekreeper]

(via thedemon-hauntedworld)


Jul 13

mucholderthen:

Moons of the Solar System

size comparison chart of [23 of the 173] moons in the Solar System 
(
Dan Matutina)

(via scientificillustration)


Jul 6

If Andromeda were brighter, this is how it would look in our night sky. They’re all out there, we just can’t see them
Distance to Earth: 2,538,000 light years

If Andromeda were brighter, this is how it would look in our night sky.
They’re all out there, we just can’t see them

Distance to Earth: 2,538,000 light years

(via startrekdata)



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