Brain-Rain.

Science in action. And also, goofing off.

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Posts tagged animals

Sep 25
earthandanimals:


Black-and-green Poison Frog (Costa Rica) by Juan Carlos Vindas

earthandanimals:

Black-and-green Poison Frog (Costa Rica) by 

(via amphiblog)


Aug 23
rhamphotheca:

King Eider (Somateria spectabilis) male, Norway
photograph by Ron Knight

rhamphotheca:

King Eider (Somateria spectabilis) male, Norway

photograph by Ron Knight

(via iaccidentallyallthephysics)


Aug 5

Aug 1

Jul 29
zooborns:

Sedqwick County Zoo Films Birth of Little-studied Amphibian Species

On December 12, eight Kaup’s Caecilians were born on exhibit at the Sedgwick County Zoo in Kansas! Although they might look like earthworms or little snakes, Caecilians (pronounced seh-SILL-yens) are amphibians, related to frogs and salamanders.

Learn more about this important birth at Zooborns

zooborns:

Sedqwick County Zoo Films Birth of Little-studied Amphibian Species

On December 12, eight Kaup’s Caecilians were born on exhibit at the Sedgwick County Zoo in Kansas! Although they might look like earthworms or little snakes, Caecilians (pronounced seh-SILL-yens) are amphibians, related to frogs and salamanders.

Learn more about this important birth at Zooborns

(via amphiblog)


Jul 18

unofficialrivermonsters:

This giant Japanese salamander video with over a million views is probably the most cutest (yes I did just say that) thing I’ve ever seen!

Though they’re known to inflict injury to people, this guy comes up to it and asks, "Daijoubu? (Are you okay?/Okay?)” while it continues to walk along the sidewalk from its onlooker.

Remember when Jeremy had to catch one in S3

(via amphiblog)


Jun 11

ultraviolents:

titusnowl:

THE SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL ZOO LET THE OTTERS HAVE A CASIO

so important

(via stahl-ebooks)


Jun 4
creatures-alive:

Blue-Spotted Salamander (by Tristan Schramer)

creatures-alive:

Blue-Spotted Salamander (by Tristan Schramer)

(via amphiblog)


May 29

amnhnyc:

Happy World Turtle Day! We’re shellebrating our fine reptilian friends with some turtle fun-facts.

Did you know:

  • There are approximately 290 species of turtles and tortoises that inhabit oceans, fresh waters, and land environments.
  • Turtles are characterized by two broad bony shells that enclose and protect the body and jaws without teeth that form a beak-like structure.
  • Once they enter the sea after hatching, male Hawksbill sea turtles never leave it, and females come out only to lay their eggs.
  • Did you know the Museum is helping to preserve the iconic Galápagos tortoise Lonesome George?
  • For centuries, ships would load up on Galápagos tortoises to provide fresh meat during sea voyages, one tortoise could provide 200 pounds of meat.
  • The Leatherback is the largest turtle, reaching a length of almost 6 feet, while smaller species, such as the Bog turtle, reach a maximum shell length of 4 inches. 
  • Did you know that two brother African spur-thighed tortoises live in the Museum? Meet Hermes and Mud!
  • Softshell turtles, genus Trionyx, have gill-like filaments in their pharynx that serve as respiratory organs.

Stop by the Hall of Reptiles and Amphibians to learn more. 


Mar 27

falabaloo:

Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey (camouflage)  

(via ichthyologist)


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