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Posts tagged Sharks

Aug 18
mindblowingscience:

Twilight Zone: Glow-in-the-Dark Sharks Need Special Eyes to See

In the “twilight zone” of the deep ocean, strange glowing sharks have evolved eyes that are adapted to see complex patterns of light in the dark, new research reveals.
These bioluminescent sharks have a higher density of light-sensitive cells in their retinas, and some species have even developed other visual adaptations that help them see the glimmering lights they use to signal to each other, find prey and camouflage themselves in this region where little light penetrates, according to a study published today (Aug. 6) in the journalPLOS ONE.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Twilight Zone: Glow-in-the-Dark Sharks Need Special Eyes to See

In the “twilight zone” of the deep ocean, strange glowing sharks have evolved eyes that are adapted to see complex patterns of light in the dark, new research reveals.

These bioluminescent sharks have a higher density of light-sensitive cells in their retinas, and some species have even developed other visual adaptations that help them see the glimmering lights they use to signal to each other, find prey and camouflage themselves in this region where little light penetrates, according to a study published today (Aug. 6) in the journalPLOS ONE.

Continue Reading.


Aug 16
griseus:

this is a baby redspotted catshark (Schroederichthys chilensis) still in its egg case. He’s not ready to hatch, is still in 4 stage of 6 stage of development.
by the way, the first layers were removed to show the embryo, this does not affect the development of the shark
video Camila rayen Barría Cárdenas

griseus:

this is a baby redspotted catshark (Schroederichthys chilensis) still in its egg case. He’s not ready to hatch, is still in 4 stage of 6 stage of development.

by the way, the first layers were removed to show the embryo, this does not affect the development of the shark


Aug 15
dynamicoceans:

Whale sharks can live up to 70 years, are the largest fish, and only eat plankton!
And they give live birth!

dynamicoceans:

Whale sharks can live up to 70 years, are the largest fish, and only eat plankton!

And they give live birth!


Aug 14

marine-conservation:

This is probably the closest you will ever get from a Great White shark bite without being injured or losing a limb.

In 2013, a team from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution took a specially equipped REMUS “SharkCam” underwater vehicle to Guadalupe Island in Mexico to film great white sharks in the wild. They captured more than they hoped for. This incredible footage is set to air on this year’s Shark Week. 

REMUS stands for Remote Environmental Monitoring Unit.The pre-programmed SharkCam is controlled by scientists, and features 6 GoPro video cameras, providing a spectacular 360 degrees view of the surroundings. These cameras were mounted on underwater probe REMUS-100. It can go as deep as 100 meters or 328 feet and can stay underwater for a maximum of eight hours.

REMUS doesn’t intrude with the routines or behavior of marine animals. However, it was getting noticed by a bunch of sharks, stalked, and sometimes bitten from underneath.  The SharkCam was fortunate enough to have survived the series of shark attacks and brought home recordings for scientific studies—along with the shark bite marks on it.


Aug 13

Aug 12

dynamicoceans:

Horned shark hatching


Aug 11

endangereduglythings:

whatthefauna:

The sawfish uses its long, toothed rostrum not for killing, but for immobilizing. Also known as the carpenter shark, its nose is covered in electrosensitive pores that detect small movements in the water. When it detects food nearby, the shark slashes its nose through the water to stun prey long enough to gobble it up.

Image credit: Elyse Booth

The rostrum is a lot more maneuverable than I thought. Look at it juggle that fish into its mouth.

(via ichthyologist)


Aug 10
thesharkives:

whale shark
 (by mtv1983)

thesharkives:

whale shark


(by mtv1983)

(via shaaarks)


Jun 21
coolsciencegifs:

Basking shark in Cork Harbour, Ireland
The basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, is the largest shark species normally found in British waters, growing up to 6-8m in length. It’s also the second largest shark in the world, beaten only by the Whale Shark (12.65m in length maximum recorded). 
Despite being one of the biggest fish in the sea, this species feeds solely on plankton and does not actively hunt larger prey.  A gentle giant! 
This footage was taken from a drone.

Video Source: Ocean Escapes

coolsciencegifs:

Basking shark in Cork Harbour, Ireland

The basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus, is the largest shark species normally found in British waters, growing up to 6-8m in length. It’s also the second largest shark in the world, beaten only by the Whale Shark (12.65m in length maximum recorded). 

Despite being one of the biggest fish in the sea, this species feeds solely on plankton and does not actively hunt larger prey.  A gentle giant! 

This footage was taken from a drone.

Video Source: Ocean Escapes


Jun 17

pinkhairandbubblegum:

SHARKS and TROPHIC CASCADES

What Happens When Sharks Disappear?
Infographics by Lily Williams

(via thesharkives)


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