Brain-Rain.

Science in action. And also, goofing off.

Join me in my quest to become brilliant.

Posts tagged Science

Jul 4
scienceisbeauty:

Interesting reading in The New York Times about Gravity: Still Exerting a Hold on Science.

scienceisbeauty:

Interesting reading in The New York Times about Gravity: Still Exerting a Hold on Science.

(via spacequakes)


Jun 29

Jun 20
alexturnerplease:

witchyroses:

omjephillips:

witchyroses:

WHAT IS HAPPENING HERE?!??!??!

It’s quicksand. Quicksand is much thicker than water, which is why things sink so slowly. By that same logic, one can walk on its surface if you go fast enough and with little enough pressure, like skipping a stone on water.

THAT IS FANTASTIC

THIS IS NOT HOW I THOUGHT QUICKSAND WORKED.

alexturnerplease:

witchyroses:

omjephillips:

witchyroses:

WHAT IS HAPPENING HERE?!??!??!

It’s quicksand. Quicksand is much thicker than water, which is why things sink so slowly. By that same logic, one can walk on its surface if you go fast enough and with little enough pressure, like skipping a stone on water.

THAT IS FANTASTIC

THIS IS NOT HOW I THOUGHT QUICKSAND WORKED.

(via oswinious)


Jun 8

Out of the cradle
onto dry land
here it is
standing:
atoms with consciousness;
matter with curiosity.


Stands at the sea,
wonders at wondering: I
a universe of atoms
an atom in the universe.

On the theme of “Are You Alone?” here’s an excerpt from a poem by Richard Feynman, one of my favorite things that’s ever been written about anything, ever.
(via jtotheizzoe)

Jun 2
sciencejokes:

tornadoesandscientists:

drkrislynn:

humanisticscience:

thejunglenook:

scienceisbeauty:

What scientists say in research papers vs. What they actually mean (via io9).

I shouldn’t be laughing this hard.

Yes. This is good.

Omg it’s like my college career staring right at me.

My thesis, ladies and gents.

My research paper will probably encompass all these terms.

sciencejokes:

tornadoesandscientists:

drkrislynn:

humanisticscience:

thejunglenook:

scienceisbeauty:

What scientists say in research papers vs. What they actually mean (via io9).

I shouldn’t be laughing this hard.

Yes. This is good.

Omg it’s like my college career staring right at me.

My thesis, ladies and gents.

My research paper will probably encompass all these terms.


Feb 26
astrakiseki:

ruzansan:

twisteddoodles:

Working in science vs not working in science.

I wanna show this to every dork that gets excited about worthless half-assed scientific papers that get spun into supposedly paradigm-shifting ‘discoveries’ by corporate PR jerks and over-eager click-hungry journalists.

Science can answer anything, eventually, with unlimited funding.

astrakiseki:

ruzansan:

twisteddoodles:

Working in science vs not working in science.

I wanna show this to every dork that gets excited about worthless half-assed scientific papers that get spun into supposedly paradigm-shifting ‘discoveries’ by corporate PR jerks and over-eager click-hungry journalists.

Science can answer anything, eventually, with unlimited funding.

(via positrons-deactivated20140315)


Feb 25

tomatogami:

ANOTHER INCREDIBLE FEAT ACHIEVED BY SCIENTISTS

(via jtrohmeme)


Feb 17

Feb 14

kenobi-wan-obi:

Representation in STEM: Black Women Making Their Mark in Space and Science

Today, there is an increased push for the American education system to improve their STEM programs as well as to get students to show interest in the fields. It is important to bring attention to some of the African-American females that have, and are still, paving the road for future scientists, astronauts or any STEM degree holders.

These women are just some of the many examples of African-American contributions to science. (Descriptions pertain to the women in the order they appear on the photoset, from up down, left right)

Mercedes Richards PH.D is a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Pennsylvania State University. Originally from Jamaica, Dr. Richards received her Doctoral degree at the University of Toronto. In 2010 Dr. Richards received the Fulbright Award to conduct research at the Astronomical Institute in Slovakia. research focus is on binary stars; twin stars formed at the same time.

Willie Hobbs Moore PH.D is the first African-American woman to earn a PH.D in physics in 1972. She received it at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Her thesis research involved important problems in vibrational analysis of macro molecules.

Beth Brown PH.D (1969-2008) was an Astrophysicist in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Born in Roanoke, VA, she grew up watching Star Trek and Star Wars and was fascinated with space. In 1998, Dr. Brown becoming the first African-American woman to earn a doctorate in Astronomy from the University of Michigan.

Chanda Prescod-Weinstein PH.D is currently a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow at the Observational Lab in Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Maryland. Originally from Los Angeles California Dr. Prescod-Weinstein specializes in theoretical cosmology.

Dara Norman PH.D is a professor at the University of Washington. Dr. Norman grew up in the south side of Chicago Illinois. She went to MIT as an Undergraduate and worked at NASA Goddard in Maryland. Dr. Norman currently specializes in gravitational lensing, large scale structure and quasars (quasi-stellar objects). This year she was honored with the University’s Timeless Award for her contributions and accomplishments to astronomy. In 2009 she was invited to the Star Party at the White House.

Jeanette J. Epps PH.D from Syracuse NY is a NASA astronaut. She received her PH.D in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Marylan in 2000. Dr. Epps was selected in 2009 to be one of the 14 members of the 20th NASA astronaut class. She recently graduated from Astronaut Candidate Training.

Shirley Ann Jackson PH.D is the second African-American woman to earn a PH.D in physics and the first from MIT. In 2009 Dr. Jackson was appointed to serve on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. She is currently the President of the Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute.

(via laboratoryequipment)


Feb 8
scienceyoucanlove:

Great women of science Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958) - British biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA, RNA, viruses, coal, and graphite. Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867-1934) - Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. Chien-Shiung Wu (1912-1997) - Chinese American physicist with expertise in the techniques of experimental physics and radioactivity. Émilie du Châtelet (1706-1749) - French mathematician, physicist, and author during the Age of Enlightenment.Mae Jemison (1956) - American physician and NASA astronaut. She became the first African American woman to travel in space when she went into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on September 12, 1992.Vera Rubin (1928) - American astronomer who pioneered work on galaxy rotation rates. She is famous for uncovering the discrepancy between the predicted angular motion of galaxies and the observed motion, by studying galactic rotation curves. Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) - English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine. Because of this, she is often described as the world’s first computer programmer.
read more

scienceyoucanlove:

Great women of science 

Rosalind Franklin (1920-1958) - British biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA, RNA, viruses, coal, and graphite. 

Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867-1934) - Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. 

Chien-Shiung Wu (1912-1997) - Chinese American physicist with expertise in the techniques of experimental physics and radioactivity. 

Émilie du Châtelet (1706-1749) - French mathematician, physicist, and author during the Age of Enlightenment.

Mae Jemison (1956) - American physician and NASA astronaut. She became the first African American woman to travel in space when she went into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on September 12, 1992.

Vera Rubin (1928) - American astronomer who pioneered work on galaxy rotation rates. She is famous for uncovering the discrepancy between the predicted angular motion of galaxies and the observed motion, by studying galactic rotation curves. 

Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) - English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine. Because of this, she is often described as the world’s first computer programmer.

read more

(via s-cientia)


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