Brain-Rain.

Science in action. And also, goofing off.

Join me in my quest to become brilliant.

Posts tagged Math

Aug 24
planetaryfolklore:

beesandbombs: hexagons / stars

planetaryfolklore:

beesandbombs: hexagons / stars

(via spacequakes)


Aug 13
xysciences:

Each dot is only moving in a straight line, but is created by balls moving in circles through 3 dimensional space. 
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

xysciences:

Each dot is only moving in a straight line, but is created by balls moving in circles through 3 dimensional space. 

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

(via visualizingmath)


Aug 7

Aug 6
xysciences:

Geometrical symmetry, with the amount of sides per shape increasing by one each time.
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs] 

xysciences:

Geometrical symmetry, with the amount of sides per shape increasing by one each time.

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs] 


Aug 5

ryanandmath:

How to read math. You’d be surprised how far this will get you.

EDIT: Some corrections

(via likeaphysicist)


Aug 3
trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Geometrical visualisation of a 4D shape from a 3D Perspective - The Tesseract
Hypercubes are shapes with n dimensions where n is greater than the 3 dimensions of a normal cube. The Tesseract, or the 4-cube, is a 4 dimensional hypercube.
where n is the dimensional number, in any hypercube:

vertices = 2^n
edges = n(2^n-1 )
faces = 2^n-3(n-1)n

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Geometrical visualisation of a 4D shape from a 3D Perspective - The Tesseract

Hypercubes are shapes with n dimensions where n is greater than the 3 dimensions of a normal cube. The Tesseract, or the 4-cube, is a 4 dimensional hypercube.

where n is the dimensional number, in any hypercube:

vertices = 2^n

edges = n(2^n-1 )

faces = 2^n-3(n-1)n

(via visualizingmath)


Jul 22

mathmajik:

"While fractal geometry is often used in high-tech science, its patterns are surprisingly common in traditional African designs," said Ron Eglash, senior lecturer in comparative studies in the humanities. Eglash is author of African Fractals: Modern Computing and Indigenous Design (Rutgers University Press, 1999).

Eglash said his work suggests that African mathematics is more complex than previously thought. He also says using African fractals in U.S. classrooms may boost interest in math among students, particularly African Americans. He has developed a Web page to help teachers use fractal geometry in the classroom. (http://www.cohums.ohio-state.edu/comp/eglash.dir/afractal.htm)

Fractals are geometric patterns that repeat on ever-shrinking scales. Many natural objects, like ferns, tree branches, and lung bronchial systems are shaped like fractals. Fractals can also be seen in many of the swirling patterns produced by computer graphics, and have become an important new tool for modeling in biology, geology, and other natural sciences.

In African Fractals, Eglash discusses fractal patterns that appear in widespread components of indigenous African culture, from braided hairstyles and kente cloth to counting systems and the design of homes and settlements.

Sources: csdt.rpi.edu aziarts.com theskylinedesigngroup.wordpress.com leahchappel.wordpress.com

(via visualizingmath)


Jul 21
mejoradadj:

"The scientific way to cut a cake"
Written by a cousin of Charles Darwin

mejoradadj:

"The scientific way to cut a cake"

Written by a cousin of Charles Darwin

(via scientificillustration)


May 25
“In elementary and middle school, we hide math’s great masterpieces from students’ view. The arithmetic, algebraic equations and geometric proofs we do teach are important, but they are to mathematics what whitewashing a fence is to Picasso — so reductive it’s almost a lie.” UC Berkeley’s (via ucresearch)

(via ucresearch)


Apr 2
roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.
Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.

Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

(via mugumugu)


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