Brain-Rain.

Science in action. And also, goofing off.

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Posts tagged Math

Jul 22

mathmajik:

"While fractal geometry is often used in high-tech science, its patterns are surprisingly common in traditional African designs," said Ron Eglash, senior lecturer in comparative studies in the humanities. Eglash is author of African Fractals: Modern Computing and Indigenous Design (Rutgers University Press, 1999).

Eglash said his work suggests that African mathematics is more complex than previously thought. He also says using African fractals in U.S. classrooms may boost interest in math among students, particularly African Americans. He has developed a Web page to help teachers use fractal geometry in the classroom. (http://www.cohums.ohio-state.edu/comp/eglash.dir/afractal.htm)

Fractals are geometric patterns that repeat on ever-shrinking scales. Many natural objects, like ferns, tree branches, and lung bronchial systems are shaped like fractals. Fractals can also be seen in many of the swirling patterns produced by computer graphics, and have become an important new tool for modeling in biology, geology, and other natural sciences.

In African Fractals, Eglash discusses fractal patterns that appear in widespread components of indigenous African culture, from braided hairstyles and kente cloth to counting systems and the design of homes and settlements.

Sources: csdt.rpi.edu aziarts.com theskylinedesigngroup.wordpress.com leahchappel.wordpress.com

(via visualizingmath)


Jul 21
mejoradadj:

"The scientific way to cut a cake"
Written by a cousin of Charles Darwin

mejoradadj:

"The scientific way to cut a cake"

Written by a cousin of Charles Darwin

(via scientificillustration)


May 25
“In elementary and middle school, we hide math’s great masterpieces from students’ view. The arithmetic, algebraic equations and geometric proofs we do teach are important, but they are to mathematics what whitewashing a fence is to Picasso — so reductive it’s almost a lie.” UC Berkeley’s (via ucresearch)

(via ucresearch)


Apr 2
roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.
Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.

Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

(via mugumugu)


Mar 26

Mar 19
“You enter the first room of the mansion and it’s completely dark. You stumble around bumping into the furniture but gradually you learn where each piece of furniture is. Finally, after six months or so, you find the light switch, you turn it on, and suddenly it’s all illuminated. You can see exactly where you were. Then you move into the next room and spend another six months in the dark. So each of these breakthroughs, while sometimes they’re momentary, sometimes over a period of a day or two, they are the culmination of, and couldn’t exist without, the many months of stumbling around in the dark that precede them.” Andrew Wiles on mathematics research, (referenced in this blog post)

(via positrons-deactivated20140315)


Mar 14

jtotheizzoe:

This pi may be old, but it’s still delicious.  

Gah, I love vintage Coronet Instructional Films. You can watch the whole Coronet archive here, for free!

via okkultmotionpictures:

Happy OKKULT Pi Day


EXCERPTS >|< Meaning Of Pi (1949)


 | Hosted at: Internet Archive
 | From: A/V Geek Film Archive
 | Download: Ogg | h.264 | MPEG4
 | Digital Copy: Public Domain Mark 1.0

A series of Animated GIFs excerpted from Meaning of Pi (1949). The video Explains how pi denotes the ratio of a circle to its diameter, shows the use of circles in art, industry and commerce, outlines a procedure by which the numerical value of pi can be checked and reviewed, and describes the discovery and importance of pi.

We invite you to watch the full video HERE


Excerpts by OKKULT Motion Pictures: a collection of GIFs excerpted from open source/unknown/rare/controversial moving images.
A digital curation project for the diffusion of open knowledge.

>|<


Mar 10

aesir-blade:

Vibrational modes of a circular drum — time frequency not to scale.

(via positrons-deactivated20140315)


Mar 7
studygeek:

Here is one of the recent forays into math &amp; art that a lot of people find somehow calming.

studygeek:

Here is one of the recent forays into math & art that a lot of people find somehow calming.

(via cloverinblue)


Feb 13

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