Brain-Rain.

Science in action. And also, goofing off.

Join me in my quest to become brilliant.

Sep 18
distant-traveller:


Hubble looks at light and dark in the universe







This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a variety of intriguing cosmic phenomena.
Surrounded by bright stars, towards the upper middle of the frame we see a small young stellar object (YSO) known as SSTC2D J033038.2+303212. Located in the constellation of Perseus, this star is in the early stages of its life and is still forming into a fully-grown star. In this view from Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys(ACS) it appears to have a murky chimney of material emanating outwards and downwards, framed by bright bursts of gas flowing from the star itself. This fledgling star is actually surrounded by a bright disk of material swirling around it as it forms — a disc that we see edge-on from our perspective.
However, this small bright speck is dwarfed by its cosmic neighbor towards the bottom of the frame, a clump of bright, wispy gas swirling around as it appears to spew dark material out into space. The bright cloud is a reflection nebula known as [B77] 63, a cloud of interstellar gas that is reflecting light from the stars embedded within it. There are actually a number of bright stars within [B77] 63, most notably the emission-line star LkHA 326, and it nearby neighbor LZK 18.
These stars are lighting up the surrounding gas and sculpting it into the wispy shape seen in this image. However, the most dramatic part of the image seems to be a dark stream of smoke piling outwards from [B77] 63 and its stars — a dark nebula called Dobashi 4173. Dark nebulae are incredibly dense clouds of pitch-dark material that obscure the patches of sky behind them, seemingly creating great rips and eerily empty chunks of sky. The stars speckled on top of this extreme blackness actually lie between us and Dobashi 4173.

Image credit: ESA/NASA

distant-traveller:

Hubble looks at light and dark in the universe

This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a variety of intriguing cosmic phenomena.

Surrounded by bright stars, towards the upper middle of the frame we see a small young stellar object (YSO) known as SSTC2D J033038.2+303212. Located in the constellation of Perseus, this star is in the early stages of its life and is still forming into a fully-grown star. In this view from Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys(ACS) it appears to have a murky chimney of material emanating outwards and downwards, framed by bright bursts of gas flowing from the star itself. This fledgling star is actually surrounded by a bright disk of material swirling around it as it forms — a disc that we see edge-on from our perspective.

However, this small bright speck is dwarfed by its cosmic neighbor towards the bottom of the frame, a clump of bright, wispy gas swirling around as it appears to spew dark material out into space. The bright cloud is a reflection nebula known as [B77] 63, a cloud of interstellar gas that is reflecting light from the stars embedded within it. There are actually a number of bright stars within [B77] 63, most notably the emission-line star LkHA 326, and it nearby neighbor LZK 18.

These stars are lighting up the surrounding gas and sculpting it into the wispy shape seen in this image. However, the most dramatic part of the image seems to be a dark stream of smoke piling outwards from [B77] 63 and its stars — a dark nebula called Dobashi 4173. Dark nebulae are incredibly dense clouds of pitch-dark material that obscure the patches of sky behind them, seemingly creating great rips and eerily empty chunks of sky. The stars speckled on top of this extreme blackness actually lie between us and Dobashi 4173.

Image credit: ESA/NASA


Sep 17
ioanaiuliana21:

Land of mathematics

ioanaiuliana21:

Land of mathematics

(via physicistsneedlovetoo)



70sscifiart:

Happy Literacy Day. By Lance Miyamoto, 1981.

70sscifiart:

Happy Literacy Day. By Lance Miyamoto, 1981.


Sep 16
gypsylolita:

Crystal Visions

gypsylolita:

Crystal Visions

(via mineralia)


Sep 12
madddscience:

David Pelham, for Olaf Stapledon’s ‘Sirius,’ 1975

madddscience:

David Pelham, for Olaf Stapledon’s ‘Sirius,’ 1975

(via 70sscifiart)


huffingtonpost:

NASA’s Curiosity Rover Looks Pretty Rough After Two Years On Mars (PHOTOS)

Curiosity killed the cat? Maybe. But one thing’s for sure—Mars is slowly killing Curiosity.

See all the photos of the rover here. 

(via spaceexp)



Sep 11
izzy-the-fish-girl:

Super Soaker! Spitting Fish Target Prey with Amazing Aim
by: Stephanie Pappas
Asia’s zebra-striped archerfish “shoot” their prey with streams of water that they use as a tool, a new study finds. Archerfish aren’t the only fish that use tools; the Pacific orange-dotted tuskfish uses rocks to crush clamshells. But archerfish are the only fish known to use adjustable jets of water as tools, according to the new study, published today (Sept. 4) in the journal Current Biology.The fish can shoot land-based prey — including insects, spiders and even lizards — off of leaves and branches and into the water from a distance of up to 6.5 feet (2 meters) away. Previous research had found that the fish gather the water between the tongue and the roof of the mouth, forming a gun-barrel-like shape before spitting it out in powerful streams. In the new study, the researchers found that the fish modulate these jets so that the water is focused into a powerful point before impact — a talent that would seem to require a lot of brainpower.
[See the archerfish in action]
(read more) LiveScience   |||   Photo credit: Ingo Rischawy

izzy-the-fish-girl:

Super Soaker! Spitting Fish Target Prey with Amazing Aim

by: Stephanie Pappas

Asia’s zebra-striped archerfish “shoot” their prey with streams of water that they use as a tool, a new study finds. Archerfish aren’t the only fish that use tools; the Pacific orange-dotted tuskfish uses rocks to crush clamshells. But archerfish are the only fish known to use adjustable jets of water as tools, according to the new study, published today (Sept. 4) in the journal Current Biology.

The fish can shoot land-based prey — including insects, spiders and even lizards — off of leaves and branches and into the water from a distance of up to 6.5 feet (2 meters) away. Previous research had found that the fish gather the water between the tongue and the roof of the mouth, forming a gun-barrel-like shape before spitting it out in powerful streams. In the new study, the researchers found that the fish modulate these jets so that the water is focused into a powerful point before impact — a talent that would seem to require a lot of brainpower.

[See the archerfish in action]

(read more) LiveScience   |||   Photo credit: Ingo Rischawy

(via ichthyologist)


amnhnyc:

Today’s peek into the archives is headed back to school! “Public school class on guided tour" was taken by Robert Elwood Logan in 1947. 
Did you ever come to the Museum as part of a school group? The American Museum of Natural History receives 500,000 visitors annually in school and camp groups. To plan your own group visit, check out our website. 
AMNH/2A1154

amnhnyc:

Today’s peek into the archives is headed back to school! “Public school class on guided tour" was taken by Robert Elwood Logan in 1947.

Did you ever come to the Museum as part of a school group? The American Museum of Natural History receives 500,000 visitors annually in school and camp groups. To plan your own group visit, check out our website

AMNH/2A1154