Brain-Rain.

Science in action. And also, goofing off.

Join me in my quest to become brilliant.

Aug 12
70sscifiart:

Alex Schomburg

70sscifiart:

Alex Schomburg


dynamicoceans:

Horned shark hatching


Aug 11

skunkbear:

The evil geniuses at NASA Ames Research Center are trying to create super intelligent soccer balls with a top-secret vaporized serum! … er … wait, no. They’re just studying the aerodynamics of the official World Cup ball - the “Brazuca.”

Geoff Brumfiel has the full story here.

Football fluid dynamics is a touchy subject on the international stage. Goalies hated the 2010 World Cup’s ball (the too-smooth “Jabulani”) because it was said to swerve and twist in the air. Joe Palca covered that story four years ago.

NPR: covering ball aerodynamics since 1971.

(via freshphotons)


endangereduglythings:

whatthefauna:

The sawfish uses its long, toothed rostrum not for killing, but for immobilizing. Also known as the carpenter shark, its nose is covered in electrosensitive pores that detect small movements in the water. When it detects food nearby, the shark slashes its nose through the water to stun prey long enough to gobble it up.

Image credit: Elyse Booth

The rostrum is a lot more maneuverable than I thought. Look at it juggle that fish into its mouth.

(via ichthyologist)


humanoidhistory:

monkijuice:

humanoidhistory:

July 16, 1969 — The liftoff of Apollo 11 seen from inside the firing room at Cape Canaveral, Florida.

We’ve never been to the moon.

The estimated 450,000 people who worked directly or indirectly on the Apollo program are inclined to disagree.

humanoidhistory:

monkijuice:

humanoidhistory:

July 16, 1969 — The liftoff of Apollo 11 seen from inside the firing room at Cape Canaveral, Florida.

We’ve never been to the moon.

The estimated 450,000 people who worked directly or indirectly on the Apollo program are inclined to disagree.


Aug 10
thesharkives:

whale shark
 (by mtv1983)

thesharkives:

whale shark


(by mtv1983)

(via shaaarks)


Aug 7
70sscifiart:

70sscifiart:

Don’t miss that alien watch.

Space Cat Saturday reblog.

70sscifiart:

70sscifiart:

Don’t miss that alien watch.

Space Cat Saturday reblog.


geewhiz:

A lady assembling typewriters, 1957. From oztypewriter.

geewhiz:

A lady assembling typewriters, 1957. From oztypewriter.

(via cloverinblue)



Aug 6
distant-traveller:

Orion arising

Orion’s belt runs just along the horizon, seen through Earth’s atmosphere and rising in this starry snapshot from low Earth orbit on board the International Space Station. The belt stars, Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka run right to left and Orion’s sword, home to the great Orion Nebula, hangs above his belt, an orientation unfamiliar to denizens of the planet’s northern hemisphere. That puts bright star Rigel, at the foot of Orion, still higher above Orion’s belt. Of course the brightest celestial beacon in the frame is Sirius, alpha star of the constellation Canis Major. The station’s Destiny Laboratory module is in the foreground at the top right.

Image credit: NASA, ISS Expedition 40, Reid Wiseman

distant-traveller:

Orion arising

Orion’s belt runs just along the horizon, seen through Earth’s atmosphere and rising in this starry snapshot from low Earth orbit on board the International Space Station. The belt stars, Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka run right to left and Orion’s sword, home to the great Orion Nebula, hangs above his belt, an orientation unfamiliar to denizens of the planet’s northern hemisphere. That puts bright star Rigel, at the foot of Orion, still higher above Orion’s belt. Of course the brightest celestial beacon in the frame is Sirius, alpha star of the constellation Canis Major. The station’s Destiny Laboratory module is in the foreground at the top right.

Image credit: NASA, ISS Expedition 40, Reid Wiseman

(via scientificsatellite)