Brain-Rain.

Science in action. And also, goofing off.

Join me in my quest to become brilliant.

Aug 24
humanoidhistory:

1954 cover painting by Mel Hunter for Amazing Stories, Vol. 1, No. 5.
(Ski-Ffy)

humanoidhistory:

1954 cover painting by Mel Hunter for Amazing Stories, Vol. 1, No. 5.

(Ski-Ffy)


planetaryfolklore:

beesandbombs: hexagons / stars

planetaryfolklore:

beesandbombs: hexagons / stars

(via spacequakes)


ohstarstuff:

Happy 1 (Martian) Year Anniversary Mars Curiosity!

Today NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover will complete a Martian year — 687 Earth days on the Red Planet. Below are some of Curiosity’s accomplishments in Year 1 as compiled by NASA.

  • In August 2012, Curiosity discovered an ancient riverbed at its landing site. Nearby, at an area known as Yellowknife Bay, the mission met its main goal of determining whether the Martian Gale Crater ever was habitable for simple life forms. The answer, a historic “yes,” came from two mudstone slabs that the rover sampled with its drill. Analysis of these samples revealed the site was once a lakebed with mild water, the essential elemental ingredients for life, and a type of chemical energy source used by some microbes on Earth. If Mars had living organisms, this would have been a good home for them. 

  • Assessed natural radiation levels both during the flight to Mars and on the Martian surface provides guidance for designing the protection needed for human missions to Mars.

  • Measured heavy-versus-light variants of elements in the Martian atmosphere indicate that much of Mars’ early atmosphere disappeared by processes favoring loss of lighter atoms, such as from the top of the atmosphere. Other measurements found that the atmosphere holds very little, if any, methane, a gas that can be produced biologically.

  • Made first determinations of the age of a rock on Mars and how long a rock has been exposed to harmful radiation provide prospects for learning when water flowed and for assessing degradation rates of organic compounds in rocks and soils.

 Source: NASA.gov

(via iaccidentallyallthephysics)


Aug 23
colchrishadfield:

Weightlessness is like rapid aging. Of the 100s of experiments on ISS, we learn much from this: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/the-hazardous-effects-of-spaceflight/article19192504/

colchrishadfield:

Weightlessness is like rapid aging. Of the 100s of experiments on ISS, we learn much from this: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/the-hazardous-effects-of-spaceflight/article19192504/

(via scienceetfiction)


pikeys:

History’s Shadow by David Maisel

History’s Shadow comprises my series of re-photographed x-rays of art objects from antiquity. I have culled these x-rays from museum archives, which utilize them for conservation purposes. Through the x-ray process, the artworks of origin become de-familiarized and de-contextualized, yet acutely alive and renewed.

Artists’ Statement | More X-Rays

(via s-cientia)


rhamphotheca:

King Eider (Somateria spectabilis) male, Norway
photograph by Ron Knight

rhamphotheca:

King Eider (Somateria spectabilis) male, Norway

photograph by Ron Knight

(via iaccidentallyallthephysics)


Aug 21

(via 70sscifiart)


scientificvisuals:

If you ever need to preserve your very own giant isopod (Bathynomus giganteus), hop over to insectsafari's instructional YouTube video.



Aug 19

zerostatereflex:

Zoom Into a Microchip

It is absolutely crazy how tiny we can make things today.

What we’re seeing here is a standard microchip, older though in principle the same as modern cell phone chip.

At the micro level we’re dealing with this comparison:

"A micron is 1 millionth of a meter, 10-6 or 10-3 of a millimeter. Very tiny. It is abbreviated with the greek letter for M, or the mu."

It takes 100,000 Microns to equal about 4 inches and toward the end of the set we’re in the 1 micron range.

(via finding-things-out)