Brain-Rain.

Science in action. And also, goofing off.

Join me in my quest to become brilliant.

Mar 31
gifak-net:

Glass Fracturing At 5 Million Frames Per Second

gifak-net:

Glass Fracturing At 5 Million Frames Per Second

(via scienceing)


Mar 30
spaceplasma:

 International Space Station Fly-Around
The STS-119 crew captured these dramatic images of the International Space Station on March 19, 2009 as Discovery flew around the orbiting complex after undocking.

spaceplasma:

International Space Station Fly-Around

The STS-119 crew captured these dramatic images of the International Space Station on March 19, 2009 as Discovery flew around the orbiting complex after undocking.

(via thedemon-hauntedworld)


freakyfauna:

Robots! (1967).
From a series of Russian magazine covers.Found here.

freakyfauna:

Robots! (1967).

From a series of Russian magazine covers.
Found here.

(via itsyamtastic)


Mar 29
fastcompany:

The RoboTuna’s latest iteration comes by way of MIT, and cloaked in soft teal silicone. The fish, which keeps all of its computation and sensors in its head, contains a carbon dioxide canister that puffs pockets of gas to different parts of the body, making it undulate. It can also do something called a C-turn, an escape mechanism real fish pull off to avoid predators.
Meet the latest, greatest robo-fish

fastcompany:

The RoboTuna’s latest iteration comes by way of MIT, and cloaked in soft teal silicone. The fish, which keeps all of its computation and sensors in its head, contains a carbon dioxide canister that puffs pockets of gas to different parts of the body, making it undulate. It can also do something called a C-turn, an escape mechanism real fish pull off to avoid predators.

Meet the latest, greatest robo-fish

(via ichthyologist)



(via s-cientia)


Mar 28
perceptio-etude:

Decopunk Vehicle Concept 

perceptio-etude:

Decopunk Vehicle Concept 

(via sod61)


fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

A core-collapse, or Type II, supernova occurs in massive stars when they can no longer sustain fusion. For most of their lives, stars produce energy by fusing hydrogen into helium. Eventually, the hydrogen runs out and the core contracts until it reaches temperatures hot enough to cause the helium to fuse into carbon. This process repeats through to heavier elements, producing a pre-collapse star with onion-like layers of elements with the heaviest elements near the center. When the core consists mostly of nickel and iron, fusion will come to an end, and the core’s next collapse will trigger the supernova. When astronomers observed Supernova 1987A, the closest supernova in more than 300 years, models predicted that the onion-like layers of the supernova would persist after the explosion. But observations showed core materials reaching the surface much faster than predicting, suggesting that turbulent mixing might be carrying heavier elements outward. The images above show several time steps of a 2D simulation of this type of supernova. In the wake of the expanding shock wave, the core materials form fingers that race outward, mixing the fusion remnants. Hydrodynamically speaking, this is an example of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, in which a shock wave generates mixing between fluid layers of differing densities. (Image credit: K. Kifonidis et al.; see also B. Remington)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

A core-collapse, or Type II, supernova occurs in massive stars when they can no longer sustain fusion. For most of their lives, stars produce energy by fusing hydrogen into helium. Eventually, the hydrogen runs out and the core contracts until it reaches temperatures hot enough to cause the helium to fuse into carbon. This process repeats through to heavier elements, producing a pre-collapse star with onion-like layers of elements with the heaviest elements near the center. When the core consists mostly of nickel and iron, fusion will come to an end, and the core’s next collapse will trigger the supernova. When astronomers observed Supernova 1987A, the closest supernova in more than 300 years, models predicted that the onion-like layers of the supernova would persist after the explosion. But observations showed core materials reaching the surface much faster than predicting, suggesting that turbulent mixing might be carrying heavier elements outward. The images above show several time steps of a 2D simulation of this type of supernova. In the wake of the expanding shock wave, the core materials form fingers that race outward, mixing the fusion remnants. Hydrodynamically speaking, this is an example of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, in which a shock wave generates mixing between fluid layers of differing densities. (Image credit: K. Kifonidis et al.; see also B. Remington)

(via iaccidentallyallthephysics)


biocanvas:

Inner Ear of a Mouse
One of the most common genetic defects in human deafness is the disappearance of an important family of proteins: the claudins. Claudins are the most critical component of tight junctions (shown here in blue), the place where two adjacent cells meet. Imagine a tight circle of people linking arms to protect what’s inside; tight junctions are what protect a tissue from unwanted molecules or cells trying to pass through. When mice cannot make claudin, the tight junctions in the cochlea (the spiral-shaped portion of the inner ear) are disrupted, robbing them of their hearing sensitivity.
Image by Dr. Alexander Gow and Cherie Southwood, Wayne State University.

biocanvas:

Inner Ear of a Mouse

One of the most common genetic defects in human deafness is the disappearance of an important family of proteins: the claudins. Claudins are the most critical component of tight junctions (shown here in blue), the place where two adjacent cells meet. Imagine a tight circle of people linking arms to protect what’s inside; tight junctions are what protect a tissue from unwanted molecules or cells trying to pass through. When mice cannot make claudin, the tight junctions in the cochlea (the spiral-shaped portion of the inner ear) are disrupted, robbing them of their hearing sensitivity.

Image by Dr. Alexander Gow and Cherie Southwood, Wayne State University.

(via freshphotons)


Mar 27

falabaloo:

Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey (camouflage)  

(via ichthyologist)